Books

Book Review: Griffith Review 64: The New Distruptors is a sweeping look at new technology

October 16, 2019

The Griffith Review is known for its rich collections of thought-provoking writing and picture stories. The 64th edition, The New Disruptors is no exception. It is a deep dive into the world of technological change, from the recesses of the dark web through to those new opportunities for change. This instalment is edited by Ashley […]

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Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo jointly take home the 2019 Booker Prize

October 14, 2019

In a surprising turn of events Margaret Atwood and Bernardine Evaristo have been jointly awarded the 2019 Booker Prize for Fiction for The Testaments and Girl, Woman, Other respectively. Whilst it is not the first time the prize has been awarded jointly, the rules were changed back in the 90’s to rule out such an occasion. But, cut to 2019 […]

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Book Review: Josephine Rowe’s Here Until August is a collection to savour

October 10, 2019

Josephine Rowe‘s newest collection of short stories, Here Until August is a slim but beautiful looking collection. It’s striking blue and purple cover makes you want to pick it up. And you should, because what is inside is just as fascinating as out. It begins with the story “Glisk” (winner of the 2016 ABR/Elizabeth Jolley Prize) […]

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Book Review: Andrew Stafford’s new memoir takes us back to rock ‘n’ roll high school

September 29, 2019

Long before The Ramones were co-opted for an ad, they were a punk band who appealed to suburbanite teens. Andrew Stafford was one such fan, which his memoir, Something to Believe In proves. Across the book’s pages he takes readers to rock ‘n’ roll high school, educating them on all matters of music and madness […]

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Book Review: Lenny Bartulin’s Fortune is a cinematic romp through time

September 19, 2019

In 1806, after conquering Prussia with his armies, Napoleon Bonaparte led a procession into Berlin through the Brandenburg Gate. Watching in the crowd is an eighteen year old man named Johannes Meyer who will soon find himself swept up in the tide of history. Fortune is a novel which traces its way around the big […]

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Book Review: Bronwyn Eley launches an exciting new YA fantasy with Relic

September 5, 2019

Everyone in Edriast knows the role of Shadow is a death sentence. Tasked with serving the local lord, Rennard, Shadows spend their days in dangerously close proximity to one of five Relics, a powerful object worn by the reigning lord. The longer they spend around it, the weaker they become, until, one day, it takes […]

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Salman Rushdie and Margaret Atwood head up 2019 Booker Prize shortlist

September 3, 2019

Starting the process with more than 150 submissions, The Booker Prize has announced its 2019 shortlist, with six novels vying for one of the most coveted prizes in English literature. Open to writers of any nationality, the prize celebrates work published in the UK or Ireland, from the previous October to the coming end of […]

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Book Review: Albert Woodfox’s Solitary is a searing indictment on “justice”

August 31, 2019

Twenty-three hours a day. Forty-three years. Three men. A six-by-nine foot cell. These are the all important numbers that form the basis of Albert Woodfox‘s memoir Solitary, which covers one of the biggest miscarriages of justice in U.S. history. This story is one that will enrage you so much you’ll want to throw the book at those […]

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Interview: Debut author Bronwyn Eley gives us the lowdown on her upcoming YA fantasy, Relic

August 29, 2019

With just a few short weeks until her debut YA fantasy hits bookstores, we were lucky enough to grab five minutes with Sydney author Bronwyn Eley, to chat about trilogy opener Relic, her writing process, and her ever growing TBR pile!   First things first – can you tell us a little bit about Relic and Kaylan, […]

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Book Review: Dysfunction is rife in Ruby Porter’s engrossing debut Attraction

August 26, 2019

The unnamed narrator in Ruby Porter‘s Michael Gifkins Prize winning debut novel Attraction can’t seem to get her mind to focus. She and her girlfriend, Ilana, and her best friend, Ashi, are on a road trip to the narrator’s family beach house in New Zealand’s North Island. The trip is one of escape for our protagonist, but […]

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Book Review: Kathryn Hind’s debut, Hitch takes readers on a journey in more than one sense of the word

August 11, 2019

Canberra-based author Kathryn Hind‘s debut novel Hitch was published in June this year. The inaugural winner of the Penguin Literary Prize, Hitch tells the story of Amelia, a young woman of indeterminate age, who is hitchhiking her way to Melbourne. Her journey is an emotional one as well as a physical one, and throughout the book, there […]

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Book Review: Whitney Scharer explores a real life romance in The Age of Light

August 9, 2019

The year is 1926, and American model Lee Miller has arrived in Paris. Leaving behind a successful career at Vogue, she’s ready to take her place behind the camera, rather than in front of it. After convincing surrealist Man Ray to take her on as his assistant, she begins her education, but soon finds herself […]

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Book Review: Rohan Wilson’s Daughter of Bad Times presents a disturbing view of the future

August 5, 2019

Rohan Wilson’s latest novel, Daughter of Bad Times is a novel with an extremely global outlook, but this may just be its problem. The novel follows two protagonists, Rin Braden and Yamaan Ali Umair, two lovers from very different circumstances. Rin is the daughter of Alessandra Braden, the CEO of Cabey-Yasuda Corrections, a company which owns […]

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Melissa Lucashenko takes home the 2019 Miles Franklin

July 30, 2019

Brisbane based writer Melissa Lucashenko has been awarded the Miles Franklin Literary Award for her novel Too Much Lip, beating out five other shortlisted works to the $60,000 prize. Lucashenko’s win makes her the third Indigenous author to take home the prize, alongside past winners Kim Scott and Alexis Wright. Published by UQP, Too Much Lip follows […]

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Interview: Dyschronia author Jennifer Mills on the climate emergency, Ancient Greek oracles, and her Miles Franklin nomination

July 29, 2019

The Miles Franklin Literary Award will be announced later today, and we’re slipping one last nominee interview in before the big reveal! This time, we’re chatting to Jennifer Mills, author of Dyschronia! Congratulations on making the Miles Franklin shortlist! What was it like to hear the news? Thank you! It was and is wonderful: to feel […]

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Book Review: Tony Birch’s The White Girl pushes beyond the limits of love in one family’s experience of the Protection Act

July 28, 2019

The town that makes up the main setting of Tony Birch’s new novel The White Girl is a fictional one, but it could have been anywhere in Australia. The novel tells the story of Odette Brown, an Indigenous woman who was raised on the mission in Deane separated from her family, and in particular her father. She lives on […]

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Interview: Author Rodney Hall on The Stolen Season and his 2019 Miles Franklin nomination

July 27, 2019

Author Rodney Hall is a two time Miles Franklin winner, and his latest book, A Stolen Season, has seen him snap up a third nomination this year. We caught up with him for a quickfire interview, ahead of the announcement of the winner next week! First of all, congratulations on the nomination! What was it […]

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Interview: Miles Franklin nominee Gregory Day talks A Sand Archive, local inspiration, and bookish discoveries

July 27, 2019

We’re continuing our series of interviews with Miles Franklin nominees! With the winner announcement just around the corner, it’s now the the turn of Gregory Day, author of A Sand Archive! Congratulations on making the Miles Franklin shortlist! What was it like to hear the news? As you might imagine it felt satisfying for my work […]

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Interview: Michael Mohammed Ahmad talks The Lebs ahead of the Miles Franklin award announcement

July 26, 2019

Michael Mohammed Ahmad is an Arab-Australian writer, editor and teacher. He is also the founder and director of Sweatshop, a literary arts collective based in Western Sydney that helps develop work by culturally diverse writers. He is also the award winning author of The Tribe and his most recent work, The Lebs, which has been […]

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The 2019 ‘Booker Dozen’ revealed

July 24, 2019

The longlist for the 2019 Booker Prize is out, but readers will have to wait a little while to pick up copies of a few of the contenders, with books such as The Testaments not due out until September 2019. This list, hotly anticipated by bibliophiles everywhere, is notoriously difficult to predict, and 2019 is […]

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Book Review: Take a trip through the history of cinema with Dominic Smith’s The Electric Hotel

July 23, 2019

Pioneering French filmmaker Claude Ballard has lived at the Hotel Knickerbocker for almost half a century. It’s a quiet existence, by Hollywood hotel standards at least, and Claude fills his days taking photographs and keeping an eye on the hotel’s more vulnerable residents. But when an enthusiastic young film student arrives, keen to discover the […]

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Book Review: Bindy Pritchard’s Fabulous Lives offers a series of rich vignettes from a motley crew of characters

July 22, 2019

A suburban family finds a prehistoric egg. A lonely woman aids a fallen angel. An American woman plots to take the Parisian honey industry by storm. These are just a few of the moments captured in Bindy Pritchard‘s stunning short story collection Fabulous Lives. Curious, yet always relatable, Pritchard’s vignettes are filled with the sort of […]

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Book Review: The Oremere Chronicles draws to a close with Helen Scheuerer’s action packed War of Mist

July 18, 2019

After a terrifying clash with the enemy in the Havennesse mountains, our gang of rebels and Valian warriors have headed back to Queen Eydis’ castle to regroup and plan for the war ahead. But with Bleak’s head still reeling from revelations about her past, and the captive they planned to use as leverage against Ines […]

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Interview: Author Helen Scheuerer talks closing out The Oremere Chronicles, lessons learned, and new adventures

July 11, 2019

Author Helen Scheuerer is just a couple of weeks away from wrapping up her Amazon best selling series The Oremere Chronicles. With War of Mist due out on July 25th, we caught up with her to find out as much as we could about the epic finale! So, we’re just a few weeks out from the […]

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Book Review: Inspector Gereon Rath returns in Volker Kutscher’s The Silent Death

July 8, 2019

The year is 1930. With talkies on the rise, the age of silent cinema is coming to a close, and it seems there’s someone on the Berlin streets who’s not quite ready to let it go. Cinema starlets are showing up dead at an alarming rate and, as if Inspector Gereon Rath doesn’t already have […]

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Miles Franklin Literary Award announces 2019 shortlist

July 2, 2019

Six Australian writers have been shortlisted for the 2019 Miles Franklin Award at a ceremony held this evening at the State Library of NSW. Among those shortlisted are debut authors, Michael Mohammed Ahmad (The Lebs) and Jennifer Mills (Dyschronia), and two-time Miles Franklin award winner, Rodney Hall (A Stolen Season). Gail Jones, whose book The Death of Noah […]

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Book Review: #MeToo: Stories from the Australian Movement is a strong anthology from a diverse choir of voices

June 25, 2019

In October 2017 when the hashtag #MeToo went viral, a lot of the popularity was chalked up to some rich, white celebrities speaking out. What these media reports failed to acknowledge however was that the movement’s true founder was Tarana Burke. This new anthology, #MeToo: Stories from the Australian Movement, is broadens #MeToo’s scope, whilst […]

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Book Review: Amanda O’Callaghan’s This Taste for Silence marks the arrival of a quietly macabre talent

June 23, 2019

The body count is high in Amanda O’Callaghan’s debut short story collection, This Taste for Silence. From the very first story, death, murder and unexplained disappearances emerge as a dominant theme in this collection which has been described by Ryan O’Neill as ‘utterly haunting.’ Brisbane-based author O’Callaghan is an internationally acclaimed writer of short (and very […]

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Book Review: Jocelyn Moorhouse’s memoir is proof that love is all you need

June 23, 2019

Jocelyn Moorhouse knows how to spin a great yarn. The Dressmaker director has had a rich career in film, and this forms part of her memoir, Unconditional Love. This book looks at her brilliant career, including her collaborations with filmmaker husband, PJ Hogan (Muriel’s Wedding). But, Moorhouse’s most intriguing chapters are about her experiences with […]

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Interview: Elizabeth Kuiper talks Little Stones, Zimbabwe, representation and creative journeys

June 13, 2019

Earlier this month saw the publication of Elizabeth Kuiper’s debut novel Little Stones. The novel, which draws upon Kuiper’s own childhood experiences, follows the story of Hannah, a young white Zimbabwean as she navigates everyday life in a country under the control of Robert Mugabe.  Following the novel’s release we sat down with Elizabeth to […]

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